The Last VI Flying Bomb Launched on 29th March 1945


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Although it happened a long time ago the memory of those terror weapons are still vivid in my mind. During the 2nd World War, my sister and I came close to death when a VI destroyed the flat we were renting near London. Fortunately we were out at the time. On another occasion we stood on our doorstep watching a V1 flying overhead, I was five and had my fingers in the door jamb. The wind blew the door shut on my fingers, I thought the VI had hit me!!! I lost the nail of the middle finger of my right hand. When the new nail grew in it was never quite straight, hence I call it my war wound.
The V-1 flying bomb — also known as the Buzz Bomb or Doodlebug — was an early pulse-jet-powered predecessor of the cruise missile.

The V-1 was developed at Peenemünde Airfield by the German Luftwaffe during the Second World War. The first of the so-called Vergeltungswaffen series designed for terror bombing of London, the V-1 was fired from “ski” launch sites along the French (Pas-de-Calais) and Dutch coasts. The first V-1 was launched at London on 13 June 1944, one week after (and prompted by) the successful Allied landing in Europe. At its peak, more than one hundred V-1s a day were fired at southeast England, 9,521 in total, decreasing in number as sites were overrun until October 1944, when the last V-1 site in range of Britain was overrun by Allied forces. This caused the remaining V-1s to be directed at the port of Antwerp and other targets in Belgium, with 2,448 V-1s being launched. The attacks stopped when the last site was overrun on 29 March 1945. In total, the V-1 attacks caused 22,892 casualties (almost entirely civilians).

I thank God that I survived and I’m here today to wish everyone a Very Happy Easter on Good Friday 29th March 2013.
God Bless and keep reading.

About irishroverpei

Author of "Lily & Me", "The Royal Navy & Me" and Chapter XXl Armageddon. Writer, blogger and RN Submariner, antique automobile enthusiast.
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