Christmas Story 1945. The Christmas Mars Bar”


This story takes place in England in 1945 in the little town of Beaminister. The war was over, however, we were still feeling the effects of rationing and shortages. Sweets and chocolate were still a very rare commodity in the land.

mars bar

I still firmly believed in Father Christmas, and was about to demonstrate just how strong my faith was.   On Christmas Eve I hung my sock at the foot of the bed, hoping to find it filled with all sorts of exciting things the following morning. I awoke around six the next morning; it was still dark outside, and the house was silent. My sock lay bulging with presents at the foot of the bed. I wasn’t supposed to open anything until everyone was up and about.   Not wishing to start off the day in trouble, I tried hard to resist looking in my sock..   It was quite impossible to expect a young child to exhibit such patience. I decided to empty my sock onto the bed and guess what each package contained.   Afterwards, still unopened, I’d re-pack everything and no one would be the wiser. The theory was good and would have worked, but for one small mistake. Among the presents were a few things not wrapped. It was traditional to have a new penny, an apple, and an orange in the sock.   None of these items were wrapped, but were also not tempting enough to be a problem. What really caught my eye was a Mars bar – an irresistible sight!   Sweets and chocolates were still rationed, consequently I saw very few and tasted even fewer. Finding myself with one whole bar of chocolate was just too much. It was the first one I’d ever had. Unable to control myself, I knew I had to eat it. Then, it occurred to me that no one would know about it anyway because it was Father Christmas who had left it. I could safely eat the bar as long as I carefully hid the wrapper. I ate the scrumptious chocolate with relish; I was totally committed but equally convinced I was in the clear.

By 7:30 the family was up and we went down stairs to open our presents together. It was a very exciting moment. In front of the fireplace I found a brand new red scooter waiting for me. Wow! It was my first new toy ever; until then, my presents had mostly been handmade from wood. Once we’d opened everything, it was time to look at each other’s gifts, and Lily asked what I’d found in my sock. I told her about everything, but was careful not to mention the missing Mars bar. I was surprised and puzzled when she continued to press, asking what else I’d got. How could she know about the chocolate? It was impossible. I decided to stick to my story, confident that everything would turn out okay, but in so doing I gradually dug myself into a bigger and deeper hole. The consequence of sneaking my early morning chocolate landed me in trouble after all. Fortunately Lily was in a festive mood and the moment passed quickly. It did, however, cause me to rethink my belief in Father Christmas..

God Bless and keep reading ( and Mars Bars are still my favourite)

***

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About irishroverpei

Author of "Lily & Me", "The Royal Navy & Me" and Chapter XXl Armageddon. Writer, blogger and RN Submariner, antique automobile enthusiast.
This entry was posted in Belfast Social History, family and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Christmas Story 1945. The Christmas Mars Bar”

  1. Neville PEARSON says:

    Christmas 1952, my first leave(Holiday) from the Royal Navy, of which I had been a member since Nov 17th 1952, and I was going home for 21 days, Got paid and went to the NAFFI and got a 4oz box of Dairy Milk Chocolates for my Mother and took them home, Candy was still on ration in those days and that was all I could afford on the pay scale of a Boy Telegraphist in the “GOOD OLD DAYS” Blessing and keep reading.

    • irishroverpei says:

      We have much in common Neville. I join on 15th march 1955 and three weeks later was on my way home on Easter leave, hardly knew how to wear my uniform let alone much else.

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